A Christmas Carol Reading: I discover that I must be a monster

So, for some reason I felt the urge to start reading A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens.  I guess I viewed myself viewing Dickens during one of his reading performances, and put myself in a sort of scene as in the Doctor Who episode The Unquiet Dead.  As I was reading this, I started to laugh at Dickens’ emphasis that Marley was certainly dead:

Marley was dead: to begin with.  There is no doubt whatever about that.  The register of his burial was signed by the clergyman, the clerk, the undertaker, and the chief mourner.  Scrooge signed it: and Scrooge’s name was good upon ‘Change, for anything he chose to put his hand to.  Old Marley was as dead as a door-nail.

Mind!  I don’t mean to say that I know, of my own knowledge, what there is particularly dead about a door-nail.  I might have been inclined, myself, to regard a coffin-nail as the deadest piece of ironmongery in the trade.  But the wisdom of our ancestors is in the simile; and my unhallowed hands shall not disturb it, or the Country’s done for.  You will therefore permit me to repeat, emphatically, that Marley was as dead as a door-nail.

Scrooge knew he was dead?  Of course he did. How could it be otherwise?  Scrooge and he were partners for I don’t know how many years.  Scrooge was his sole executor, his sole administrator, his sole assign, his sole residuary legatee, his sole friend and sole mourner.  And even Scrooge was not so dreadfully cut up by the sad event, but that he was an excellent man of business on the very day of the funeral, and solemnised it with an undoubted bargain.

The mention of Marley’s funeral brings me back to the point I started from.  There is no doubt that Marley was dead.

Either I have been overused to reading this during my school days and didn’t really lend myself to much imagination when reading this, or Dickens had a good sense of humor, or I am a monster.

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